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Islington U3A Calendar

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Mon 18 Dec 2017 2.00 pm     History In A Global Context     

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Tue 19 Dec 2017 10.00 am     Painting & Drawing     

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Thu 21 Dec 2017 2.30 pm     Scrabble     

Details Please email if you intend to come to this one, you'll be contacted if others are likely to attend.

Wed 3 Jan 2018 2.30 pm     Scrabble     

Details Venue will be decided

Wed 3 Jan 2018 5.00 pm     Book Group 6     

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Fri 5 Jan 2018 2.00 pm     Book Group - Science Fiction     The Time Machine

Details Classic longish short story by H.G. Wells

Mon 8 Jan 2018 10.30 am     Artists Work     

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Mon 8 Jan 2018 2.00 pm     Yoga     

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Mon 8 Jan 2018 3.30 pm     I-Pad Users     

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Tue 9 Jan 2018 2.00 pm     Chess for beginners     

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Tue 9 Jan 2018 7.30 pm     Theatre - Fringe     Top Hat

Details Top Hat tells the timeless tale of Broadway sensation Jerry Travers who dances his way across Europe to win the heart of society girl Dale Tremont in a riotous mistaken-identity plot. Featuring Irving Berlin’s classic songs ‘Cheek to Cheek’, ‘Let’s Face the Music and Dance’, ‘Puttin’ on the Ritz’, and ‘Top Hat, White Tie and Tails’.

Wed 10 Jan 2018 2.30 pm     Theatre visits     'Cell Mates' at Hampstead Theatre

Details By Simon Gary, directed by Edward Hall

Thu 11 Jan 2018 10.30 am     Green Issues     Energy Saving in the Home

Details A visit to a group member's home

Fri 12 Jan 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     Longer Walk

Details To follow

Mon 15 Jan 2018 2.00 pm     Yoga     

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Mon 15 Jan 2018 7.00 pm     Open meeting     Quiz evening

Details Our annual quiz night - a fun and informative evening and an opportunity to meet other iU3A members. Contact Isabel Dickson on iu3Amembers@outlook.com to book tickets - £8 each which includes one glass of wine/beer or soft drink.

Tue 16 Jan 2018 2.30 pm     Art in London     discussion group about Jasper Johns exhibition

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Tue 16 Jan 2018 2.30 pm     Book Group- French 1     Athalie by Racine

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Wed 17 Jan 2018 10.00 am     Discovering Islington On Foot     Highlights of the City, part 2

Details with Dianne Hally

Wed 17 Jan 2018 4.00 pm     Local History     

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Thu 18 Jan 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     Longer Walk

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Thu 18 Jan 2018 10.30 am     Architecture     Greek & Roman architecture-Parthenon Galleries

Details 2. Brief introduction to Ancient Greece. Image caption: Horsemen from the west frieze of the Parthenon-Greek, about 438-32 BC During the Bronze Age (around 3200 – 1100 BC), a number of cultures flourished on the islands of the Cyclades, in Crete and on the Greek mainland. They were mainly farmers, but trade across the sea, particularly in raw materials such as obsidian (volcanic glass) and metals, was growing. The collapse of Mycenaean civilisation around 1100 BC brought about a period of isolation known as the Dark Age. But by around 800 BC the revival had begun as trade with the wider world increased, arts, crafts and writing re-emerged and city-states (poleis) developed. By around 500 BC ‘rule by the people’, or democracy, had emerged in the city of Athens. Following the defeat of a Persian invasion in 480-479 BC, mainland Greece and Athens in particular entered into a golden age. In drama and philosophy, literature, art and architecture Athens was second to none. The city’s empire stretched from the western Mediterranean to the Black Sea, creating enormous wealth. This paid for one of the biggest public building projects ever seen in Greece, which included the Parthenon. Every fourth year between 776 BC and AD 395, the Olympic Games, held in honour of the god Zeus, the supreme god of Greek mythology, attracted people from across Greece. Crowds watched sports such as running, discus-throwing and the long-jump. Ancient Greece also played a vital role in the early history of coinage. As well as making some of the world’s earliest coins, the ancient Greeks were the first to use them extensively in trade. Following the death of Alexander and the division of his empire, the Hellenistic period (323-31 BC) saw Greek power and culture extended across the Middle East and as far as the Indus Valley. When Rome absorbed the Greek world into its vast empire, Greek ideas, art and culture greatly influenced the Romans. The British Museum collection includes objects from across the entire Greek world, ranging in date from the beginning of pre-history to early Christianity in the Byzantine era. http://www.britishmuseum.org/explore/cultures/europe/ancient_greece.aspx

Thu 18 Jan 2018 2.30 pm     Scrabble     

Details at The Coach House, 9 Highbury Place, N5 1QZ

Fri 19 Jan 2018 9.30 am     Birdwatching     Otmoor - Starling Murmurations

Details Possibly. Details to be considered yet

Mon 22 Jan 2018 10.00 am     Book Group - German     "Die Verlorene Ehre der Katharine Blum" by Heinrich Boell

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Mon 22 Jan 2018 2.00 pm     Yoga     

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Tue 23 Jan 2018 7.30 pm     Theatre - Fringe     Tiny Dynamite

Details WHEN MEMORY TAKES HOLD, WHEN CHAOS TAKES OVER, AND WHEN THE ELECTRICITY BETWEEN US BECOMES OVERWHELMING. AN IMPOSSIBLE LOVE STORY IS GIVEN A SECOND CHANCE AND THREE SCORCHED CHARACTERS ARE ABOUT TO LEARN THAT LIGHTNING DOES STRIKE TWICE. During their annual pilgrimage to the countryside, two childhood friends, forever bound by a terrible event from their past, encounter a beautiful stranger who couldn’t possibly exist. Threatening to uncover a truth long since buried, these friends must learn to take responsibility for their lives or risk spending the rest of them running from their guilt. Exploring how tiny events from our pasts can have explosive effects on our futures, Tiny Dynamite asks whether we really can shed the experiences, memories and people that shape us.

Wed 24 Jan 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     Longer Walk

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Fri 26 Jan 2018 11.00 am     Art in London     Modigliani at Tate Modern

Details Tate Modern

Mon 29 Jan 2018 2.00 pm     Yoga     

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Tue 30 Jan 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     Longer Walk

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Thu 1 Feb 2018 2.30 pm     Scrabble     

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Mon 5 Feb 2018 9.30 am     Birdwatching     Birdwatching Visit

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Mon 5 Feb 2018 2.00 pm     Yoga     

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Thu 8 Feb 2018 10.30 am     Green Issues     Renewables: a personal story

Details Presentation by Mary Ann Peters on her experience of designing a home powered by renewables 20 years ago in the US

Fri 9 Feb 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     Longer Walk

Details To follow

Fri 9 Feb 2018 2.00 pm     Book Group - Science Fiction     Orbitsville

Details First book in a trilogy by Bob Shaw - so, if you enjoy it, you'll know what to read next!

Mon 12 Feb 2018 2.00 pm     Yoga     

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Mon 12 Feb 2018 3.30 pm     I-Pad Users     

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Wed 14 Feb 2018 2.30 pm     Scrabble     

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Thu 15 Feb 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     Longer Walk

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Thu 15 Feb 2018 10.30 am     Architecture     Introduction to Gothic architecture-Henry VII Chapel.

Details A very brief introduction to Gothic architecture. Gothic architecture emerged in Northern Europe during the Middle Ages, a period in which the Church dominated European cultural life - consequently, the finest examples of Gothic architecture are cathedrals and monasteries. Master stonemasons and their workshops produced buildings of great height that were also full of light. Based on elaborate practical geometry, Gothic architecture combines three key structural elements 1.the lancet (pointed) arch, which was able to hold a greater load than a rounded arch; 2.the ribbed vault, a system of vaulting that provides a ceiling that is higher, lighter and able to join spans of different widths; 3.the flying buttress, a system of masonry blocks (the buttress), attached with arches to the exterior walls of the building, countering outward thrust from the high ceiling and walls. In combination, these three elements allowed for the replacement of thick walls with tracery, very thin stone patterns holding stained glass. Ecclesiastical buildings were highly decorated with biblical figures, gargoyles (gross monsters), animals, plants and even pagan figures. As with the architecture of ancient Greece and Rome, many Gothic buildings are now bare stone when originally they were richly decorated with coloured paintwork. Gothic architecture creates a unique experiences - a constant sense of movement as the eye follows the lines made by the ribs of the arches and vaults, a powerful upward lift, and extraordinary displays of light and colour. These buildings were more than houses of God - through the stained glass and carved figures they were engines for the gathering and education of all members of European society. A Gothic cathedral is the product, often sometimes hundreds, of years of work and the combination of the skills and knowledge of many master craftsmen. K Roberts.

Sun 18 Feb 2018 2.00 pm     Theatre visits     'Long Day's Journey into Night' at Wyndhams Theatre

Details By Eugene O'Neill, directed by Richard Eyre, with Jeremy Irons and Lesley Manville

Wed 21 Feb 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     Longer Walk

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Wed 21 Feb 2018 10.00 am     Discovering Islington On Foot     Clerkenwell

Details with Barry Mellor

Fri 23 Feb 2018 9.30 am     Birdwatching     Birdwatching Visit

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Tue 27 Feb 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     Longer Walk

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Mon 5 Mar 2018 9.30 am     Birdwatching     Birdwatching Visit

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Wed 7 Mar 2018 2.30 pm     Theatre visits     'The Birthday Party' at Harold Pinter Theatre

Details By Harold Pinter, directed by Ian Rickson, with Toby Jones, Stephen Mangan and Zoe Wanamaker

Thu 8 Mar 2018 10.30 am     Green Issues     Renewables: technologies, prospects & costs

Details Presentation by Roger Hamilton

Fri 9 Mar 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     Longer Walk

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Fri 9 Mar 2018 2.00 pm     Book Group - Science Fiction     The black cloud

Details One of a handful of novels by astronomer Professor Fred Hoyle.

Mon 12 Mar 2018 3.30 pm     I-Pad Users     

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Wed 14 Mar 2018 10.00 am     Discovering Islington On Foot     Olympic Park

Details with Maeve Dorian

Thu 15 Mar 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     Longer Walk

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Thu 15 Mar 2018 10.30 am     Architecture     Introduction to Romanesque architecture-Cloister.

Details 1. BRIEF INTRODUCTION. Romanesque architecture marked the first time since the Roman Empire that a consistent architectural language appeared throughout much of Europe It derived from Rome in so much as it often appropriated such features as round arches and vaulting, although Romanesque architecture was not a continuation of Roman practices and principles. Instead, it was a revival during the Holy Roman Empire of various architectural influences of the Mediterranean region. The first phase was typified during the reign of Emperor Otto (962-73 BCE) and drew on Carolingian and Byzantine precedents, but its heyday was from the 10th to 12th centuries when some of the most advanced vaulting systems (barrel, dome and groin) were constructed, stone was dressed and elaborate details adorned buildings. Aesthetically, Romanesque architecture tends to be heavy, relying on thick load-bearing walls to support vaulted masonry roofs. Churches such as that at Cluny, France (dedicated 1130) were the most outstanding manifestations of the style, but it was also used in military installations and domestic buildings Romanesque churches are characterized by symmetrical plans, solidity of form, fireproof masonry construction, vaulted roofs, round arched openings and, in larger structures, arcades of massive supporting columns and piers. Romanesque architecture flourished throughout southern and western Europe from the 8th century, and is characterized by load-bearing masonry walls, round arches, narrow openings, arcades and vaulting. Experimentation by master builders and stonemasons, not scientific analysis, led to a steady refinement of construction techniques into the 12th century. The features that characterize Romanesque architecture were, ironically, also the attributes constraining its progress. The structurally inefficient round arch was replaced by the pointed arch, liberating the exterior walls from much of their load bearing duties, and in time giving rise to the next great architectural epoch, Gothic. 2. ARCHITECTURAL CHARACTER The term Romanesque includes those phases of European architecture which were based on Roman art from the end of the Roman Empire in A.D. 475 up to the end of the twelfth century, when the pointed arch was introduced, and this general survey of the style is given before treating of the development in each country, viz. in Italy (p. 269), France (p. 292), Germany (p. 312), and England (p. 337). After the Imperial rule of Rome had passed away, her genius still asserted itself in the architecture of the new states and gave it all a certain similarity, until each country developed its own style. Certain districts of Europe fell specially under the influence of Byzantine art, which was itself partly derived from Rome, but which, as East and West drifted apart, had assumed a special character. Western European archi¬tecture exhibiting Eastern influence in a paramount degree is classified as Byzantine. To appreciate the character of Romanesque architecture, we must form a mental picture of the conditions of Europe during the period known as the Dark Ages. We must imagine the remains of an ancient civilisa¬tion, vast in extent and uniform in character, no longer regulated by Roman law and no longer protected by Roman power. Its former glory was now recognisable only by the multitude of its monuments; some were still intact, others were injured or partially destroyed, most were unused, and all were alike unguarded and neglected. This is the Rip Van Winkle period of European architecture. We next see Europe rising like a strong man from the lethargy of a long sleep. He yawns, rubs his eyes, stretches his giant limbs, shakes off his slumber, and stumbles to his feet to look out again upon the work-a-day world and the treasures scattered around. He finds himself surrounded by the achievements of a proud past, and as he becomes conscious of his own needs he realises the possibilities of the present. Then with dazed eyes and groping hands he collects these treasures of art and applies them to his daily needs. From the ruins of mighty edifices, he gathers fragments of hewn stone, carved capital and sculptured frieze, and places them together, with monoliths of porphyry and marble, upon old foundations to construct some building of service to himself. Thus, by a gradual discovery and under¬standing of the uses of these old fragments, did he succeed in adapting them to new needs, and thus was a new art founded on the old. Here we have indeed" new lamps for old." In this way the birth of Romanesque archi¬tecture may be explained, for the ruins of ancient buildings served as the quarry for the new, and necessarily determined the character , both of construction and decoration, in proportion to the extent to which old features were employed

Wed 21 Mar 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     Longer Walk

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Wed 21 Mar 2018 2.00 pm     Local History     

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Fri 23 Mar 2018 9.30 am     Birdwatching     Birdwatching Visit

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Tue 27 Mar 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     Longer Walk

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Fri 6 Apr 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     Longer Walk

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Mon 9 Apr 2018 9.30 am     Birdwatching     Birdwatching Visit

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Mon 9 Apr 2018 3.30 pm     I-Pad Users     

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Wed 11 Apr 2018 2.30 pm     Theatre visits     'Caroline, or Change' at Hampstead Theatre

Details Book and Lyrics by Tony Kushner, directed by Michael Longhurst, with Sharon D Clark

Thu 12 Apr 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     Longer Walk

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Thu 12 Apr 2018 10.30 am     Architecture     Introduction to Arts & Crafts architecture-Walthamstow.

Details A Very Brief Guide to the Arts & Crafts Movement The Arts & Crafts movement began in mid-Victorian Britain in reaction to industrial and commercial advancements, and celebrated craft production of decorative arts and architecture. The Arts & Crafts movement was motivated most of all by a desire to change the way buildings were made. Industrial production had resulted in a split between the designer deciding on the look of a building, and the contractor (building firm) deciding how and with what it would be built. For many in the Arts & Crafts world, the ideal would be for the architect and the builder to be one and the same. Arts & Crafts architecture is characterized by a number of vernacular features, as Arts &. Crafts architects consciously chose to highlight local traditions in their work - low, pitched roofs, decorative brickwork, tall chimneys, irregular patterns of windows and doors, and mixtures of different kinds of material, including wood, stone, brick, tile, lead, iron and thatch. These were not only stylistic effects, but also the result of two key principles that the designer should collaborate with the builder, relying on and supporting the builder's knowledge of materials and craft techniques; and that the resulting building should be comfortable and fit within its immediate landscape. The most celebrated examples of Arts &. Crafts architecture are domestic homes, which were organized around a communal core - the hearth and inglenook, a semi-enclosed seating area around a fireplace. The interiors appear casual and comfortable, and the building and furniture demonstrate the handcrafting of the materials used. Beginning in Britain, the Arts &. Crafts movement had an international influence. German designers were particularly interested in the domestic designs, but the most enthusiastic take-up was in North America, where Arts &. Crafts principles fitted neatly with ideals of nature, landscape and community. BIOGRAPHIES: WilLIAM MORRIS 1834--96 British socialist, designer and leading theorist of the Arts & Crafts movement. Designer, craftsman, writer, he was born into a wealthy family in Walthamstow, London and educated at Marlborough School and Exeter College, Oxford. Morris became associated with the Pre¬Raphaelite Brotherhood, particularly the painter Edward Burne-Jones and the poet Dante Gabriel Rossetti. In 1861 he founded the firm of Morris, Marshall, Faulkner and Company, designing and making wallpaper, textiles, stained glass, and furniture. In 1890 Morris set up a publishing house, the Kelmscott Press, for which he designed typefaces and ornamental borders. " Have nothing in your houses that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful " WilLIAM R. LETHABY 1857-1931 British architect and art historian, co-founder of the Art Workers Guild and a leading practitioner of Arts & Crafts

Mon 16 Apr 2018 9.30 am     Birdwatching     Birdwatching Visit

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Wed 18 Apr 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     Longer Walk

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Wed 18 Apr 2018 10.00 am     Discovering Islington On Foot     City Walls

Details with Lesley Delacourt

Tue 24 Apr 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     Longer Walk

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Fri 27 Apr 2018 9.30 am     Birdwatching     Birdwatching Visit

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Fri 27 Apr 2018 2.00 pm     Book Group - Science Fiction     Zoo City

Details A winner of the Arthur C. Clarke award, first published in 2010, written by Lauren Beukes.

Fri 4 May 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     

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Mon 7 May 2018 9.30 am     Birdwatching     Birdwatching Visit

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Thu 10 May 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     

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Wed 16 May 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     

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Wed 16 May 2018 2.00 pm     Local History     

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Thu 17 May 2018 10.30 am     Architecture     Introduction to Renaissance architecture-Whitehall.

Details 8. RENAISSANCE –ARCHITECTURAL CHARACTER The Renaissance movement, which began in Italy early in the fifteenth century, created a break in the continuous evolution of European architecture which, springing from Roman and proceeding through Early Christian and Romanesque, had, during the Middle Ages, developed into Gothic in each country on national lines. Italy, which was still rich in her ancient Roman monuments, was naturally the pioneer in the Renaissance movement, especially as the Gothic style had never taken firm root in a country which had always clung to her old traditions. Though there was a ready reversion to Classic architectural forms, Gothic methods of construction often prevailed, because Roman methods of building in concrete had fallen into disuse during the Middle Ages. Thus did Classic style and forms triumph once again in spite of the prevalence for centuries of Gothic methods of construction, for which the Romans themselves had prepared the way. The two old systems were pressed into service to produce a style which, though it might be Gothic in construction, was outwardly Classic in character. The salient characteristic of this new departure was the employment of the Classic Roman "Orders" of architecture, which were now reintroduced after having been in abeyance for nearly 1,000 years. These " Orders " -Tuscan, Doric, Ionic, Corinthian, and Composite-which were standardised by Renaissance architects, such as Palladio, Vignola, Scamozzi and Chambers, were used, as by the Romans, both constructively and decoratively. It is a mistake, however, to suppose that mere copyism prevailed, for, although Roman precedent was followed, columns and entablatures appear in novel combinations for use in buildings designed to meet the requirements of the day.  

Tue 22 May 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     

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Fri 25 May 2018 9.30 am     Birdwatching     Birdwatching Visit

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Fri 1 Jun 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     

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Mon 4 Jun 2018 9.30 am     Birdwatching     Birdwatching Visit

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Thu 7 Jun 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     

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Wed 13 Jun 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     

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Thu 14 Jun 2018 10.30 am     Architecture     Upper Street Perambulation-Angel Stn.

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Tue 19 Jun 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     

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Fri 22 Jun 2018 9.30 am     Birdwatching     Birdwatching Visit

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Fri 29 Jun 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     

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Fri 6 Jul 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     

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Mon 9 Jul 2018 9.30 am     Birdwatching     Birdwatching Visit

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Thu 12 Jul 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     

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Thu 12 Jul 2018 10.30 am     Architecture     Georgian-Kenwood House.

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Wed 18 Jul 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     

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Wed 18 Jul 2018 2.00 pm     Local History     

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Tue 24 Jul 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     

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Fri 27 Jul 2018 9.30 am     Birdwatching     Birdwatching Visit

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Fri 3 Aug 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     

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Thu 9 Aug 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     

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Mon 13 Aug 2018 9.30 am     Birdwatching     Birdwatching Visit

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Wed 15 Aug 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     

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Thu 16 Aug 2018 10.30 am     Architecture     Bauhaus/Moderism-Royal Institute of British Architects.

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Tue 21 Aug 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     

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Fri 24 Aug 2018 9.30 am     Birdwatching     Birdwatching Visit

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Fri 31 Aug 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     

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Thu 6 Sep 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     

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Mon 10 Sep 2018 9.30 am     Birdwatching     Birdwatching Visit

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Wed 12 Sep 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     

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Tue 18 Sep 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     

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Wed 19 Sep 2018 2.00 pm     Local History     

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Tue 25 Sep 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     

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Fri 28 Sep 2018 9.30 am     Birdwatching     Birdwatching Visit

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Fri 28 Sep 2018 10.30 am     Architecture     Open House-TBA.

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Fri 5 Oct 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     

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Mon 8 Oct 2018 9.30 am     Birdwatching     Birdwatching Visit

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Thu 11 Oct 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     

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Thu 11 Oct 2018 12.00 pm     Architecture     Middle Temple Hall-Tudor

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Wed 17 Oct 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     

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Tue 23 Oct 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     

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Fri 26 Oct 2018 9.30 am     Birdwatching     Birdwatching Visit

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Fri 2 Nov 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     

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Mon 5 Nov 2018 9.30 am     Birdwatching     Birdwatching Visit

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Thu 8 Nov 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     

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Wed 14 Nov 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     

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Tue 20 Nov 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     

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Fri 23 Nov 2018 9.30 am     Birdwatching     Birdwatching Visit

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Mon 26 Nov 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     

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Wed 5 Dec 2018 9.30 am     Walks - Longer     

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Mon 10 Dec 2018 9.30 am     Birdwatching     Birdwatching Visit

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